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Archive for the ‘Lyrics’ Category

At first Adam called the woman God created “Ishshah.” We don’t know what language Adam actually spoke, but that’s how it’s been passed to us through the Hebrew. At present, we can’t go back to any older language for information. “Ishshah,” is Hebrew for “Woman.” That name in Genesis 2:23 doesn’t seem to us to be very personal, but to Adam it was. She was the first woman, and they were “one flesh.”

“Ishshah,” with the same spelling, also has another meaning, but it has proved difficult to research. It is listed in Strong’s Hebrew Dictionary (#801), but apparently not in Strong’s Concordance, and I can’t spend any more time on it right now. Most English Bible versions translate Ishshah as the phrase, “offering (or sacrifice) made by fire.”

Another word “Eshshah,” (#800) is the feminine form of a Hebrew word (Esh) for fire. I know there are exceptions, but women seem by nature to be more self-sacrificing creatures than men, especially toward their children. They share something special with God in the giving of life. My own mother was the most selfless person I’ve ever known, and others would say the same thing of their mothers. That’s probably the main reason for the Biblical link between the word “woman,” and a “fire offering.”

The name “Eve,” which means “life-giving”, implies being sacrificial beyond simply having a child. Genesis 3:20, and surrounding verses, sound as if Adam gave her this name around the time they left Eden. “Eve,” comes to us from the Greek “Eua,” which in turn comes from the Hebrew “Chavvah.” Genesis 3:20 tells us that Adam called her Chavvah because she was the mother of all human life (“Chay” is “life” in Hebrew). The interpretation of her name is given to us right in the verse.

Genesis 4:1 says, “Adam knew Eve his wife, and she conceived and bore Cain…” Various versions of the Script say this somewhat differently, but the meaning is the same. I think the archaic expression “knew,” conveys a broader meaning than more modern wording.

I assume that quite a bit of time passed from the creation of Adam and Eve until Cain was conceived. Genesis 1:27-28 tells us that after creating Adam and Eve, God blessed them saying, “Be fruitful and multiply; fill the earth…” Everything that God created was intended to be a blessing. Based on the fact that God instructed them to reproduce, I think it’s safe to say that Adam and Eve also “knew” each other in a physical sense before eating from the Tree of Knowledge, but that Eve did not conceive until afterward.

Contrary to Genesis 1:28, some churches teach the opposite. I think that’s one reason so many fail to recognize that the forbidden fruit had something to do with the interpretation of all knowledge, and not only one aspect of it. That failure allows the serpent a great deal of wiggle room. It gives him more leverage to twist that which was meant for a blessing into something much less. Many times in life, it’s difficult to tell where the blessing ends, and the curse begins.

When questioned about divorce in Matthew 19:3-6, Jesus reasserted the original intention for male and female, “…they are no longer two but one flesh.” Later in that section (19:14) he said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of heaven.” Think of these things in terms of love, and not of laws and rules. God continues to desire the best for us, and the greatest possible nurture for our children.

I’m borrowing these thoughts from the song “One Way,” by the late Larry Norman. God wants to take “children of the land,” raise us out of the dust, and transform us into “children of the sky.” God wanted to allow us to share in the creation of children of heaven.

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The time and culture, in which we live, colors our understanding of everything. That is one of the reasons God had to simplify the way of salvation. He had to get through some way, to a world that won’t hear what words say. He went to the cross, have you heard? Don’t his actions speak louder than words? If tears could have won us, would God only have cried?

John 11:35 says, “Jesus wept.” That is the shortest verse in the Bible. It should be an easy verse to memorize, but yet we always seem to forget. Luke 19:41 records that Jesus wept over Jerusalem. He wept for the things that could have been, and for the things that would happen instead, but the world isn’t moved very much by tears. If words could have won us, then would he have died?

His blood is a red light. Sometimes, nothing less than blood will cause mankind to stop and think. He could not live with us without dying. Acts 16:31 says, “Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved, and your household.” The sacrifice of Jesus cuts through all the red tape of knowledge, and mis-knowledge.

Sometimes the church presents itself as the “spotless bride of Christ” as if we were already in heaven. There is a spiritual, and symbolic sense in which that is true, but we’re not there yet. I don’t have anything against stained glass. I’ve admired some beautiful artwork of stained glass, but I don’t think we should look at each other through stained glass eyes. Philippians 2:3 says that we should consider others better than ourselves. Before all is said and done, it can easily turn out that way.

There is work that can only be accomplished by faithfully looking at the end result as if it were already in sight, but the church is not yet a resurrected, glorified body. Psalm 22 is a prophecy, written about a thousand years before the coming of Christ. It foretells the crucifixion of Jesus, giving us a list of the things he would experience.

He would feel as if he were one who was God-forsaken. He would be mocked. He would experience fear, weakness, and thirst. His hands and feet would be pierced, and his clothes would be divided between his tormentors. They would “cast lots,” rolling the dice to see who would get which item of clothing. Psalm 22:14 says, “I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint…”

That is the body of Christ in this world. God is trying to pull us all together through his Son (Ephesians 1:10). I don’t want to look at the church, or any individual through stained glass, and I don’t want to be seen that way. The Apostle Paul said in 1st Corinthians 13:12, “Now I know in part, but then I shall know even as I also am known.” There are things that we do know, but the Bible says we never know them as well as we should.

We can never truly know one another. We have only a few fragmented things we’ve seen or heard to judge one another by. It is natural for us to try to arrange these broken shards into some sort of picture that makes sense to us. That kind of thing happens no matter what someone believes. It is a form of worldliness that the church doesn’t seem to recognize. It may make a pretty picture, or it may not, but it isn’t totally real either way.

The Bible teaches that we shouldn’t form false images of God. We shouldn’t form false images of people either. When we form images, we won’t be able to see the real person, and someone will be hurt because of that every time.

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God couldn’t live with us without dying. Here and there, in my posts, I’ve said a few negative things about the church. Churches are made up of people, and people are imperfect. I’m not alone in complaining about the negatives of the church. If you study the Bible, you’ll notice there’s a lot in the Bible addressing the shortcomings of believers.

Regardless of our problems, there are many things “right” about the church. This song is intended to illustrate some of what God sees in believers, and in the church, and how he manages to live with us. “Elect lady,” is the apostle John’s name for the church (Second John 1:1), but the symbolism is used throughout the Bible.

I stumbled upon something this morning that I think is very beautiful. In my post, “Crystal, Chrysalis, and Christ” (in the July archive), I wrote about some of the underlying wordplay used in the Bible. I mentioned that the Greek word for “Lord” is “Kurios.” I noticed this morning that the Greek word for “Lady” used in 2nd. John 1:1 is “Kuria,” which is the feminine form of “Kurios.” I don’t know why I hadn’t noticed that before.

The Elect Lady

She believes with all her heart that he’s the only one
That Jesus is God’s only son
That he’s the only one with the power to forgive
That he died for all so she can live

She has kept his words, the letters from the past
He has promised to return at last
So she won’t hear the voice of any other sage
She will wait for him until the end of the age

God has spoken for the elect lady
And in time he’ll show her in white
And he’ll shower her in Heaven and in Earth
For when he called, she came to his side
Like a bride

Sometimes she mourns like Job with ashes in the air
Sometimes she walks in dust, in sackcloth prayer
Longing for a better world that only he can bring
His church will walk with him in white for he’s her king

And God has spoken for the elect lady
And in time he’ll show her in white
And he’ll shower her in Heaven and in Earth
For when he called, she came to his side
Like a bride

She’ll be the bride of Christ
She knows he’s back alive
She’s the bride of Christ
She wants to be by his side
She’ll be the bride of Christ
She knows she’s why he died
He was dying for her sin, to see her white
Like a bride
(slow) God has spoken for the elect lady

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Mankind wants a random world. When you don’t want a world governed by God, a random world would be the only alternative. You would have a world where the competition for control would result in endless struggles. Eventually, the world would either face annihilation, or fall to a world dictator such as the Antichrist. Since we didn’t want God to be God, and took from the Tree of Knowledge, he has allowed us to experience such a world.

I don’t like the word “allow.” That seems to imply that God was willing for these things to happen. I don’t think there is a word that conveys the correct thought. It isn’t as if God had much choice. He could have limited our intelligence to the level of our fellow creatures, or not have created at all. He could have created robotic creatures with no freedom of thought, but why would God want robots? Would I want my wife to not have freewill? Real love cannot exist without freewill.

It is very often frustrating that others have a mind of their own. The drivers of all those other cars on the freeway try to go where they want to go. We get in each others way. Sometimes there are accidents. God didn’t cause it, and he didn’t really allow it. He didn’t build the cars, or the freeway. He did give us enough intelligence to do it ourselves. All the drivers out there on the freeway are driving to suit themselves, and they resent it if a policeman falls in behind them.

Some don’t believe that God is there, working to minimize the damage, but he is. I’ve been in several accidents of different sorts. I was a very reckless kid, and I ran with a reckless crowd. I think now that God intervened on several occasions when I could have been killed or seriously injured. I’ve had friends who were killed, and others badly hurt. I’ve seen the pain suffered by their families and friends in their wake, and it caused me to rethink my own dangerous behavior.

The Bible teaches that before the fall of man, there was no such thing as death. Neither we nor the carnivorous creatures were originally intended to eat meat, but only plants (Genesis 1:30, Isaiah 11:7). After the fall of man, deviations from the original design began to occur. Devolution began to take place. The word “devils,” is from the same root as “deviation,” and I’m not sure to what extent the Devil was able to tinker with the genetics of creation, but the effects are disastrous. “Evil,” and “ill,” are words from the same origin as “devil.”

As disease and hunger became realities, other creatures began to feed upon the fallen. It would only be a small step for creatures that began to feed on fallen creatures, to begin to hunt them. If a lion was hungry, why would it wait for a creature to die?

I don’t envy God at all. It’s very hard to step aside when someone you love is making a move that will hurt them, but sometimes you must. At a certain point, a human being will begin to feel enslaved if nearly every move they make is restricted, and even greater harm can result. Sometimes even God has to let go. It’s a crucifying thing to experience, but there’s no way around it.

God has the most difficult of jobs to do. I’m thankful he doesn’t quit. He became a man, and stuck with the plan conceived before the foundation of the world, to bear the cross and make a way for his creation to enter paradise, a world that random deviations will never spoil. Someone could object to my use of the word “random” when obviously much of the deviation is intentional. The fallout of all the intentional deviation does contribute to the random effect however.  Some of my lyrics might fit fairly well here. The phrase “world without end” is from Ephesians 3:21, in the King James translation.

World Without End

This world will pass away
The builders are tearing down
Destroying the foundations
Of the very ground
Children play in broken glass
Shattered windows of the home
Some are crying in the ruins
For the Lord Jesus to come
If we let Him live in our world
He will let us live in his
His heart’s already open
To give everything there is, in the

World without end
Without an end
Go and tell a friend
There’s a world around the bend
World without end
Go and make a friend
Compel them to come in
For there’s a world without an end

Don’t you want only the good
Don’t you want a world that’s safe
Do you want to walk on the edge
Of the night and the day
Even if we reach the top
This world still has an end
For we’ll all run out of time
And we’ll fall to earth again
For we all are like the grass
The flower of it fades
Such fragile life as we
Can only live among the glades, of the

World without end
Without an end
Go and tell a friend
There’s a world around the bend
World without end
Go and make a friend
Compel them to come in
For there’s a world without an end

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I’m busy for a couple of weeks, and have little time to write, so I’m just throwing something in. Children can be a blessing in many unforeseen ways. They give you a reason to try to be strong, and to keep on going. I borrowed symbolism and imagery from the Bible for these old song lyrics.

Our Little Stars

The colder and the darker the night
The brighter are the stars
And now the stars above are coming out
As I walk out to my car
And I thank the Lord for my kids, driving home
After a long hard day
When the road is dark with dusky shades
I’m thankful for that starlight on the way

I know sometimes this old dark world is sure
To make you feel afraid
But you would not be here if not for God
And the promises he made
Only he can drive away the fears
And fill the empty space
Yes, you are our little stars, your mother and I
Pray you’ll keep on shining away

In a dark, directionless void
God sets his lights
To give us a sense of direction
And break up the night
Til the Son of Glory arises
To forever shine
I pray you have all the star-shine in your lives
That you are in mine

Little lantern faces, glowing coals
Comfort from my hearth
Jesus bless you with a cheerful faith
All your days upon the earth
Even now the Bright and Morning Star (Revelation 22:16)
Holds you in his rays
And we don’t know how close we are, but it can’t be far
Unto the perfect day

In a dark, directionless void
God sets his lights
To give us a sense of direction
And break up the night
Til the Son of Glory arises
To forever shine
I pray you have all the star-shine in your lives
That you are in mine

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I’ve been so busy that I haven’t had time to think. I’m going to post some more of my song lyrics for now.

The Broken Bread (Matt. 5:6 & Luke 22:15-20)

I’m not worthy
Still too earthy
Even after all I’ve changed.
So undeserving
It’s only mercy that I’ve
Come to trust in Jesus’ name.
There’s a place where those who hunger
After righteousness are fed.
I’ve come to the Master’s table
And I trust in what he did.
I bow my head in worship
And believe the things he said
And take the broken bread,

The Bread of Life, the Broken Bread
The Word of Life, the things he said
There’s a place where those who hunger
After righteousness are fed.
The Bread of Life, the Broken Bread

Through dark windows
A glimpse of repentance
Only God can clearly see.
His blood has drawn me
Into communion, for I
Discern his body broken for me.
Doesn’t this world make you hunger
For justice to be done
Doesn’t his cross make you thirsty
For all hearts to be won
He’s just dying to show mercy
On the cross he bowed his head and
Became the broken bread.

The Bread of Life, the Broken Bread
The Word of Life, the things he said
There’s a place where those who hunger
After righteousness are fed.
The Bread of Life, the Broken Bread

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The book of Isaiah was written more than 700 years before Jesus was born. There is an intact scroll of this book among the Dead Sea Scrolls. It is also in the Septuagint, which was translated around 250 years before Christ. It contains many prophecies of the life, and death of Jesus. Isaiah 52:13-15  & 53:1-12 are obviously about the crucifixion, and these verses are quoted several times by the New Testament writers. This section of the book is what the Ethiopian man in Acts 8:27-37 was reading.

It is very important to understand that these writings about Jesus existed before he was born into this world. This can be proven historically, and is one of many proofs that the Bible is what it claims to be. It is impossible for the Bible to exist unless it is actually the word of God. It would be impossible for Jesus to have fulfilled the prophecies if he wasn’t the Son of God.

His Visage (Isaiah 52:14)

He wasn’t only
Talking about the way that Jesus died.
The prophet’s not just speaking
Of how Jesus would be beaten and crucified.
It’s how the whole world makes Him look
With all the words of all the books and all our lives.
If you want to know the real God, don’t hide your eyes
Here is how he’s recognized.

His visage is so marred, more than any man.
When we see love so scarred, we begin to understand.
He has felt the bruise of every sin all laid upon him.
The hurtful words and deeds of every hand
Have marred him more than any man.

The Bible says the weakness
Of God is stronger than the strength of men.
God’s weakness is his love for us.
This world is only using us, and wounding him.
Though he was crucified in weakness
It is only by his stripes that we are healed.
His scars become the marks of beauty
And there the love of God cannot be veiled.

His visage is so marred, more than any man.
When we see love so scarred, we begin to understand.
He has felt the bruise of every sin all laid upon him.
The hurtful words and deeds of every hand
Have marred him more than any man.

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