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Archive for July, 2015

The pictographic form (early Paleo-Hebrew) of the name “YHWH” is a message from Christ before he came into this world. It is prophetic proof of the existence and identity of God.

The pictograph can be read in different ways that reveal the same truth. The basic message is “I (Yod*) Am the Nailed Man.” In an earlier post (see Yud-Heh-Vav-Heh in my November 2011 archives), I described how “YHWH” was depicted in early Paleo-Hebrew. I’m going to revisit that description. My last three posts are also related to this one.

Hebrew alphabetical symbols possess individual meanings, and also serve as numerals. Syllabics formed by combinations of letters may also convey “hidden” meanings, but this becomes much more subject to misinterpretation. Terms such as the “Self-Existent One,” are abbreviated translations of the meaning of the full name of YHWH. This may divert our attention from the meaning of the individual symbols. The development of the modern alphabet has also obscured background information though much of it is yet preserved in history.

The early Paleo-Hebrew pictograph for “Y” (called “Yod,” with varying spellings) means “hand,” but is shaped more like a child’s stick-figure drawing of an arm. There is a short upper arm, elbow, forearm, and an “open hand,” reaching out as if offering a handshake. Erase the upper-arm and elbow, rotate the forearm and hand 90 degrees clockwise, and you have our modern “Y” symbol. Don’t forget that Hebrew is written from right to left, so the symbol for “Y” is on the right-hand side.

The symbol for “H” (Heh, with varying spellings) can mean “Behold” (Look), “Breath,” “Window” (Hole or Air Hole), “Existence” (Life or Being). The early Paleo-Hebrew pictograph for “H” is a “stick-drawing” of a man with the arms held up, in something like a crucified position, as if to say, “Stop.”

The early Paleo-Hebrew symbol for “W” is called “Vav” (spellings vary), and means “nail,” or “hook.” It is shaped like an English “Y.” The modern Hebrew symbol is shaped more like an actual nail with the head slightly bent. Then, there is the final “H,” in “YHWH.”

He holds out his hand (Yod). Look (Heh) man, at the nail (Vav) marks! Hey, (Heh) look man! YHWH is our friend, and he became a man, extending his hand to offer eternal life, but for the preservation of all creation, he must yet remain God.

“Sacrifice and offering thou wouldest not, but (yet) a body thou hast prepared me…” “Then I said, Behold, I come. In the volume of the book it is written concerning me.” That is from Psalms 40:6-7 in the Greek Septuagint, which was translated from the Hebrew Old Testament long before Christ was born into this world. This prophetic message from the Septuagint is quoted by the New Testament writer of the book of Hebrews (Hebrews 10:5-7).

Note that Psalms 40:6 is worded differently in our current Bible translations of the Old Testament. This should not be thought of as a contradiction. It is evidence that older Hebrew manuscripts of Psalms once existed, one of which was available to the translators of the Septuagint. Punctuation, as well as the numbering of the verses, is something that was added much later in history.

The descendants of Adam and Eve are not the supreme intelligence of the universe. In spite of the “promise” of the Tree of Knowledge (Genesis 2:17), we are not “gods.” In eternity with God, we would have time for all the explanations, but for now, we need to put some trust in Jesus. It is time for a hand-take, and a handshake. Peace with God. He holds out his hand. Look man, at the nail marks. Hey, look man.

I may soon attempt to post some graphical depictions of the name “YHWH.” Graphics would make these things I’ve been writing about much easier to understand.

*Note; The Greek symbol for “G,” is shaped like a lowercase “Y” (ref. the Hebrew “Yod,” and Greek “Iota”), which could have led to a mispronunciation. Then, the Greek symbol for “U” is an uppercase “Y” (ref. the shape of the early Proto-Hebrew “Vav” (nail). “Vav,” the Hebrew “W,” also represents “U,” and “V.” These things may have been factors in the formation of the English word “God.”

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