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Archive for October, 2014

If we study the history of the world’s great monuments, we find mixed information about the treatment of the laborers who built them. There is probably a little truth to all sides of the story. Some ancient workers may have benefitted from jobs while many others, elsewhere involved in the same projects, were slaves. The same situation continues to exist around the world today. Only God knows the whole story.

The Bible doesn’t  tell us plainly that slaves were used in the building of the tower of Babel, but there’s little doubt that they were. It can’t be assumed that all workers were treated equally, even though the world was called “one”, and had one language (Genesis 11:6).

Nimrod (Genesis 10:8-12) is assumed to have begun the building (Genesis 11:6) of the “tower to heaven.” The meaning of his name is uncertain, but it is probably derived from a combination of the Hebrew words “Namar,” (Stained, or Spotted) and “Radad,” which means “Conqueror.” Some biblical names have been altered through transliteration, or translation into other languages, and may not be the original name.

Throughout history, conquered people have often been forced to serve as slaves. A semi-voluntary union with powerful rulers, or surrender to coercion over a period of time, often leads to enslavement. In the day in which we live, the world’s citizens are well on the way to being monitored by computers. I think this is primarily a misguided response to terrorism and crime. At a certain stage, a few private meetings of world leaders will result in the clicks of a few buttons, and the world’s population will be enslaved by the Antichrist (see part 1 of Antichrist’s Control in my May 2011 archives). It’s important to remember that the Antichrist will be trusted and revered at first, and his deception only revealed when it’s too late.

I believe that God postponed the end, and spared ancient slaves some blood, sweat, and tears, by interrupting the building of the tower of Babel. Whenever God intervenes, or when he doesn’t, there is always some overriding reason for the course that he takes. The confusion of language at Babel had far-reaching effects. Could not God have foreseen that codes developed from obscure languages of American Indians, would alter the outcome of the World Wars of the twentieth century?

In particular, the Allies and the U.S. achieved several strategic victories because Hitler’s army could not unravel radio transmissions based on the language of the American Navajo tribe. This played a huge role in ending Hitler’s quest for world domination.

It’s likely that God gave Adam and Eve some form of writing to represent human speech, and that most of their early descendants may have been able to read and write. Later, the multiple languages of Babel made translation necessary. Incidentally, two branches of human language, the Hamitic, and the Semitic, get their names from two of Noah’s sons. This is more accurate historically than many would like to admit.

Pictographs are thought to be the oldest form of writing, and certain alphabetical symbols do appear to have been derived from them. It’s yet possible that an older form of writing existed. Pictographs could also have begun as an attempt to bridge language barriers, or to communicate with others who could neither read nor write. They are used in that manner even today. Thus, it could be that they have always existed simultaneously with other forms of writing.

Parts of the Bible date back to the origins of human writing, and the use and transformation of pictographs into letters of various alphabets would automatically create a code that would allow multiple layers of meaning to be communicated by any writer aware of the possibilities. Some writers of the Bible allude to the ancestral meanings of the little symbols that we call letters. I assume that ancient secular writers may have done this also.

One result of the creation of multiple languages at Babel was a kaleidoscope of cultures, making it more difficult for world conquerors to bring all of mankind under complete control. Conquerors who did manage to create world empires were not able to sustain them. The confusion of man’s language at Babel has hindered some of the terrible things which man has imagined to do (Genesis 11:6). Thank God for that. Looking back at the world’s empires, there are none that I would want to be living in.

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